Gaelic place names frequently describe the feature's colour. Later writers such as Adomnán and the authors of the Irish annals also contributed to our understanding of these early toponyms.


As she proceeded on her journey some of the stones fell out, one becoming Ireland, another Rathlin and a third Texa. Jennings, Andrew and Kruse, Arne "One Coast-Three Peoples: Names and Ethnicity in the Scottish West during the Early Viking period" in Woolf, Alex (ed.) The strory behind to Rubh' leum an Laraich, the Point of the mare's leap on Muck, is also long forgotten. M'Lauchlan, Rev. Sròn, - the nose - is a sharp promontory, Druim – back &‐ is a ridge, pap or mam - breast-  is a hill,  Cruachan – hip – is a circular stone outcrop, maol – bald  head – refers to a bare, rounded headland, Gualain – shoulder – is a rounded hillside. The following list is not exhaustive, but should help in de understanding of more names. The Norse Barreyarfjorder is probably the Sound of Barra[66] and Máeyar is the Isle of May in the Firth of Forth. (Margaret MacIndeor). The majority of Islay place names derive from Gaelic, while the more readable names are either Norse in origin or have been anglicised from one or other language. [113], The Hebrides remain the stronghold of the modern Gàidhealtachd and unsurprisingly this language has had a significant influence on the islands there. He provides no evidence for this assertion. The rulers of the Kingdom of the Isles, which comprised the Hebrides, the islands of the Firth of Clyde and the Isle of Man were of Norse origin from the mid-9th century. Thomas McLauchlan urged caution, noting that it "is necessary to ensure a historical, and hence an accurate instead of a fanciful, account of our topographical terms. Peggy Earl's favourite theory, however, concerned a Danish Princess called Iula, or Yula, who left Denmark with an apron full of stones of different sizes.

First recorded in 1190. From 849 on, when Columba's relics were removed in the face of Viking incursions, written evidence from local sources all but vanishes for three hundred years. Scottish Gaelic, along with modern Manx and Irish, are descended from Middle Irish, a derivative of Old Irish, which is descended in turn from Primitive Irish.

Cook Island Baby Names For Boys: 1. [29] It has also been suggested that Nave Island off Islay could be the identity of Elena.

As humans have lived on the islands of Scotland since at least Mesolithic times, it is clear that pre-modern languages must have been used, and by extension names for the islands, that have been lost to history. These islands have all been occupied by the speakers of at least three and in many cases four or more languages since the Iron Age, and many of the names of these islands have more than one possible meaning as a result. They also owe much to the culture and customs of the people who lived in the Small Isles throughout the ages.

[86][87], The roots of several of the Hebrides may also have a pre-Celtic origin. There are many names that derive from the Scottish Gaelic language in the Hebrides and Firth of Clyde. [Note 1]. It is a term used for the language(s) thought to have been spoken by the Picts, the people of northern and central Scotland in the Early Middle Ages.

Strang, Alistair (1997) "Explaining Ptolemy's Roman Britain". [47] Fitzpatrick-Matthews follows Rivet and Smith's suggestion for Erimon but as noted above Rùm is "Ruiminn" in the Félire Óengusso. It is clear that whenever place names are recorded at an early date as having been transposed from a form of P-Celtic into Gaelic that this occurred prior to the transformation from "Old British" into modern Welsh. [42] Hirta was recorded as "Hirt" in 1202. [Note 2] The presence of the monastery on Iona led to life in this part of Scotland in the Early Middle Ages being relatively well recorded from the mid-6th to the mid-9th century. Peat Smoke and Spirit [21][24][25][Note 3] Later texts in Latin, by writers such as Solinus, use the forms Hebudes and Hæbudes.

He believes Sasura is the modern Scarba, Minerve is Holy Island and Vinion is Sanda[19] and that Daroeda, Gradena and Longis may be Lunga, The Garvellachs and Muck respectively. [84][85] This may have been Pictish but there is no clear evidence for this. Belief in fairies and other otherwordly creatures such as the Broonie, a hairy, shaggy being who helped with the farm animals, is attested by numerous place names - Cnoc an t- Sithean ( the fairy hill), Na Sitheanan (the fairy mounds), Lòn nan Gruagach (the pool of the watermaiden),  Cnoc Oilteag (hill of the Broonie). There are many names that derive from the Scottish Gaelic language in the Hebrides and Firth of Clyde.In the Northern Isles most place names have a Norse origin. [114][115], There are also examples of island names that were originally Gaelic but have become completely replaced. References to trees, plants and animals are common - e.g.

It is officially recognised as autochthonous language under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. It is as if more modern writers were unhappy with Yla or Ilay and added an 's' to make it look more like the word 'island'. More Islay books... promontory of the cave residence or height, height of the howe/mound cairn/burial ground, head of the gully, or possible broad inlet, white hollow, or named after St Finlaggan, possibly Lag Froig from Gaelic froig, a cave, frothy loch, or not crooked, or loch of the excess, loch na dala = loch of the divisions, loch of delay, long eighth farm, or locally knows as long brae, big eighth farm, or locally known as big brae, short for Ellinor, Frederick Campbell's wife.

English is a West Germanic language, the modern variant of which is generally dated from about 1550. In the Small Isles, as in the rest of the Highlands and islands, place-names are particularly descriptive of the shape, colour and size of the landscape features. Holy Island off Arran is an entirely English name as is the collective Small Isles.
But as Viking and Gaels merged into one culture - that of the Gall-Gaidheal (foreign Gaels) - the Gaelic language too absorbed the Old Norse. Amiri: Amiri is a simple and straightforward name, meaning ‘rock.’ It’s one of the fastest rising baby boy names in Cook Island. The origin is indicated in the second column of the second table by the following key: G=Gaelic name, N=Norse name, G/N=derived from elements of both languages, A=ancient. Islay's fascinating story is uncovered in this must have book. 2. This the oldest known form of the Goidelic languages, which is known only from fragments, mostly personal names, inscribed on stone in the Ogham alphabet in Ireland and western Britain up to about the 6th century. There are two islands with names of joint Norse/Celtic origin, Ballin Smith, B. and Banks, I. "[81] It therefore seems possible that the early Gaels were just as fond of "analogical reformation" as the Norse. In addition to Arran (see above) Bute may have a British root and Great and Little Cumbrae both certainly have (see below). For example, Hunter (2000) states that in relation to King Bridei I of the Picts in the sixth century: "As for Shetland, Orkney, Skye and the Western Isles, their inhabitants, most of whom appear to have been Pictish in culture and speech at this time, are likely to have regarded Bridei as a fairly distant presence.”[102][103] However, the place names that existed prior to the 9th century have been all but obliterated by the incoming Norse-speaking Gall-Ghaeils.[104]. [100] The island of Threave on the River Dee in Dumfries and Galloway takes its name from P-Celtic tref, meaning "homestead". According to Ó Corráin (1998) "when and how the Vikings conquered and occupied the Isles is unknown, perhaps unknowable"[109] although from 793 onwards repeated raids by Vikings on the British Isles are recorded. From then on, it is commonly Ila, Yla and Ilay. Hudson, Benjamin T. (October 1998) "The Scottish Chronicle". Aonach is a mountain whose summit has the form of a ridge with steepish sides.

Pytheas of Massilia visited Britain – probably sometime between 322 and 285 BC – and described it as triangular in shape, with a northern tip called Orcas.

Bot dates from 1093 and Bote from 1204. Inchkeith in the Firth of Forth is recorded as "Insula Keth" in the 12th century Life of Saint Serf. [9] For example, Adomnán records Sainea, Elena, Ommon and Oideacha in the Inner Hebrides, which are of unknown location and these names must have passed out of usage in the Norse era. Adamnan wrote it is 'Ilea', describing it as an inhabited island, "Ilea insula habitabat", and also as 'green, grassy Islay', a phrase which is still used in the Gaelic, "Ile Ghorm an Fheoir". Islay is said to have got its name from this lady, or perhaps she may havve taken her name from Islay. Thomas (Jan 1866) "On the Kymric Element in the Celtic Topography of Scotland". Work with sheep is alluded to in Fang Ruadh, the red fank, or with bringing the crops: Cnoc an t-Sabhail: the hill of the barn. The related Scots language, sometimes regarded as a variety of English, has regional and historic importance in Scotland.

Lamb, Gregor "The Orkney Tongue" in Omand (2003) p. 250. "[82], The main difference between Youngson/MacEeachern and Fitzpatrick-Matthews is that the former assumes two different routes for the relevant Ravenna listings whereas the latter assumes the second list is further north and west. [26], For the individual Hebridean islands, Islay is Ptolemy's Epidion, Malaios is Mull and his Scetis is presumed to be Skye (although it is not listed as one of the Ebudes).[19][27][28].

Several of the islands of the Clyde have possible Brythonic roots. Early Christian missionary routes may be traced through names like Cill Donnan, the site of Donnan’s church on Eigg, Gleann Mhartein on Muck celebrating St martin anor Papadil on Rum refering to a solitary priest ( papa) in one of its valley.. Uamh a’ Chrabhaidh,  the cave of worship, refers to the cave used by priests in hiding after the reformation. probably adaptations of a pre-Norse language. Lamb, Gregor "The Orkney Tongue" in Omand (2003) pp.

[Note 13]. Peat Smoke and Spirit is the last word on Islay and its whiskies. The original meaning of the name is uncertain but appears to "correspond with that of Lewis". The guide therefor relied almost entirely on the accent of just one person, who was brought up in Bowmore, but lived for many years on the Rinns of Islay. [104] However, recent research suggests that the obliteration of pre-Norse names throughout the Hebrides was almost total and Gaelic derived place names on the southern islands are of post-Norse origin. [47], Watson (1926) concluded that Adomnán's Airtraig is Shona but Geona and Ommon are unexplained and Longa could refer to several islands. It was formerly spoken over a far wider area than today, even in the recent past. Sgurr is a sharp promontory – with An Sgurr on Eigg, “The” sharp promontory by excellence. To ancient Celts, 4,000 years ago, the sound 'aub' denoted 'life-sustaining water'; it survives in 'abhainn' a river as in Abhainn Gleann Charadail, Glen Caradal’s river on Eigg, or Abhainn Sgathaig, Bog cotton river on Rum. referring to the peninsula of Kintyre. Gaelic place-names in the Small Isles. The modern names of Scottish islands stem from two main influences. Murray (1966) p. 49.
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Gaelic place names frequently describe the feature's colour. Later writers such as Adomnán and the authors of the Irish annals also contributed to our understanding of these early toponyms.


As she proceeded on her journey some of the stones fell out, one becoming Ireland, another Rathlin and a third Texa. Jennings, Andrew and Kruse, Arne "One Coast-Three Peoples: Names and Ethnicity in the Scottish West during the Early Viking period" in Woolf, Alex (ed.) The strory behind to Rubh' leum an Laraich, the Point of the mare's leap on Muck, is also long forgotten. M'Lauchlan, Rev. Sròn, - the nose - is a sharp promontory, Druim – back &‐ is a ridge, pap or mam - breast-  is a hill,  Cruachan – hip – is a circular stone outcrop, maol – bald  head – refers to a bare, rounded headland, Gualain – shoulder – is a rounded hillside. The following list is not exhaustive, but should help in de understanding of more names. The Norse Barreyarfjorder is probably the Sound of Barra[66] and Máeyar is the Isle of May in the Firth of Forth. (Margaret MacIndeor). The majority of Islay place names derive from Gaelic, while the more readable names are either Norse in origin or have been anglicised from one or other language. [113], The Hebrides remain the stronghold of the modern Gàidhealtachd and unsurprisingly this language has had a significant influence on the islands there. He provides no evidence for this assertion. The rulers of the Kingdom of the Isles, which comprised the Hebrides, the islands of the Firth of Clyde and the Isle of Man were of Norse origin from the mid-9th century. Thomas McLauchlan urged caution, noting that it "is necessary to ensure a historical, and hence an accurate instead of a fanciful, account of our topographical terms. Peggy Earl's favourite theory, however, concerned a Danish Princess called Iula, or Yula, who left Denmark with an apron full of stones of different sizes.

First recorded in 1190. From 849 on, when Columba's relics were removed in the face of Viking incursions, written evidence from local sources all but vanishes for three hundred years. Scottish Gaelic, along with modern Manx and Irish, are descended from Middle Irish, a derivative of Old Irish, which is descended in turn from Primitive Irish.

Cook Island Baby Names For Boys: 1. [29] It has also been suggested that Nave Island off Islay could be the identity of Elena.

As humans have lived on the islands of Scotland since at least Mesolithic times, it is clear that pre-modern languages must have been used, and by extension names for the islands, that have been lost to history. These islands have all been occupied by the speakers of at least three and in many cases four or more languages since the Iron Age, and many of the names of these islands have more than one possible meaning as a result. They also owe much to the culture and customs of the people who lived in the Small Isles throughout the ages.

[86][87], The roots of several of the Hebrides may also have a pre-Celtic origin. There are many names that derive from the Scottish Gaelic language in the Hebrides and Firth of Clyde. [Note 1]. It is a term used for the language(s) thought to have been spoken by the Picts, the people of northern and central Scotland in the Early Middle Ages.

Strang, Alistair (1997) "Explaining Ptolemy's Roman Britain". [47] Fitzpatrick-Matthews follows Rivet and Smith's suggestion for Erimon but as noted above Rùm is "Ruiminn" in the Félire Óengusso. It is clear that whenever place names are recorded at an early date as having been transposed from a form of P-Celtic into Gaelic that this occurred prior to the transformation from "Old British" into modern Welsh. [42] Hirta was recorded as "Hirt" in 1202. [Note 2] The presence of the monastery on Iona led to life in this part of Scotland in the Early Middle Ages being relatively well recorded from the mid-6th to the mid-9th century. Peat Smoke and Spirit [21][24][25][Note 3] Later texts in Latin, by writers such as Solinus, use the forms Hebudes and Hæbudes.

He believes Sasura is the modern Scarba, Minerve is Holy Island and Vinion is Sanda[19] and that Daroeda, Gradena and Longis may be Lunga, The Garvellachs and Muck respectively. [84][85] This may have been Pictish but there is no clear evidence for this. Belief in fairies and other otherwordly creatures such as the Broonie, a hairy, shaggy being who helped with the farm animals, is attested by numerous place names - Cnoc an t- Sithean ( the fairy hill), Na Sitheanan (the fairy mounds), Lòn nan Gruagach (the pool of the watermaiden),  Cnoc Oilteag (hill of the Broonie). There are many names that derive from the Scottish Gaelic language in the Hebrides and Firth of Clyde.In the Northern Isles most place names have a Norse origin. [114][115], There are also examples of island names that were originally Gaelic but have become completely replaced. References to trees, plants and animals are common - e.g.

It is officially recognised as autochthonous language under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. It is as if more modern writers were unhappy with Yla or Ilay and added an 's' to make it look more like the word 'island'. More Islay books... promontory of the cave residence or height, height of the howe/mound cairn/burial ground, head of the gully, or possible broad inlet, white hollow, or named after St Finlaggan, possibly Lag Froig from Gaelic froig, a cave, frothy loch, or not crooked, or loch of the excess, loch na dala = loch of the divisions, loch of delay, long eighth farm, or locally knows as long brae, big eighth farm, or locally known as big brae, short for Ellinor, Frederick Campbell's wife.

English is a West Germanic language, the modern variant of which is generally dated from about 1550. In the Small Isles, as in the rest of the Highlands and islands, place-names are particularly descriptive of the shape, colour and size of the landscape features. Holy Island off Arran is an entirely English name as is the collective Small Isles.
But as Viking and Gaels merged into one culture - that of the Gall-Gaidheal (foreign Gaels) - the Gaelic language too absorbed the Old Norse. Amiri: Amiri is a simple and straightforward name, meaning ‘rock.’ It’s one of the fastest rising baby boy names in Cook Island. The origin is indicated in the second column of the second table by the following key: G=Gaelic name, N=Norse name, G/N=derived from elements of both languages, A=ancient. Islay's fascinating story is uncovered in this must have book. 2. This the oldest known form of the Goidelic languages, which is known only from fragments, mostly personal names, inscribed on stone in the Ogham alphabet in Ireland and western Britain up to about the 6th century. There are two islands with names of joint Norse/Celtic origin, Ballin Smith, B. and Banks, I. "[81] It therefore seems possible that the early Gaels were just as fond of "analogical reformation" as the Norse. In addition to Arran (see above) Bute may have a British root and Great and Little Cumbrae both certainly have (see below). For example, Hunter (2000) states that in relation to King Bridei I of the Picts in the sixth century: "As for Shetland, Orkney, Skye and the Western Isles, their inhabitants, most of whom appear to have been Pictish in culture and speech at this time, are likely to have regarded Bridei as a fairly distant presence.”[102][103] However, the place names that existed prior to the 9th century have been all but obliterated by the incoming Norse-speaking Gall-Ghaeils.[104]. [100] The island of Threave on the River Dee in Dumfries and Galloway takes its name from P-Celtic tref, meaning "homestead". According to Ó Corráin (1998) "when and how the Vikings conquered and occupied the Isles is unknown, perhaps unknowable"[109] although from 793 onwards repeated raids by Vikings on the British Isles are recorded. From then on, it is commonly Ila, Yla and Ilay. Hudson, Benjamin T. (October 1998) "The Scottish Chronicle". Aonach is a mountain whose summit has the form of a ridge with steepish sides.

Pytheas of Massilia visited Britain – probably sometime between 322 and 285 BC – and described it as triangular in shape, with a northern tip called Orcas.

Bot dates from 1093 and Bote from 1204. Inchkeith in the Firth of Forth is recorded as "Insula Keth" in the 12th century Life of Saint Serf. [9] For example, Adomnán records Sainea, Elena, Ommon and Oideacha in the Inner Hebrides, which are of unknown location and these names must have passed out of usage in the Norse era. Adamnan wrote it is 'Ilea', describing it as an inhabited island, "Ilea insula habitabat", and also as 'green, grassy Islay', a phrase which is still used in the Gaelic, "Ile Ghorm an Fheoir". Islay is said to have got its name from this lady, or perhaps she may havve taken her name from Islay. Thomas (Jan 1866) "On the Kymric Element in the Celtic Topography of Scotland". Work with sheep is alluded to in Fang Ruadh, the red fank, or with bringing the crops: Cnoc an t-Sabhail: the hill of the barn. The related Scots language, sometimes regarded as a variety of English, has regional and historic importance in Scotland.

Lamb, Gregor "The Orkney Tongue" in Omand (2003) p. 250. "[82], The main difference between Youngson/MacEeachern and Fitzpatrick-Matthews is that the former assumes two different routes for the relevant Ravenna listings whereas the latter assumes the second list is further north and west. [26], For the individual Hebridean islands, Islay is Ptolemy's Epidion, Malaios is Mull and his Scetis is presumed to be Skye (although it is not listed as one of the Ebudes).[19][27][28].

Several of the islands of the Clyde have possible Brythonic roots. Early Christian missionary routes may be traced through names like Cill Donnan, the site of Donnan’s church on Eigg, Gleann Mhartein on Muck celebrating St martin anor Papadil on Rum refering to a solitary priest ( papa) in one of its valley.. Uamh a’ Chrabhaidh,  the cave of worship, refers to the cave used by priests in hiding after the reformation. probably adaptations of a pre-Norse language. Lamb, Gregor "The Orkney Tongue" in Omand (2003) pp.

[Note 13]. Peat Smoke and Spirit is the last word on Islay and its whiskies. The original meaning of the name is uncertain but appears to "correspond with that of Lewis". The guide therefor relied almost entirely on the accent of just one person, who was brought up in Bowmore, but lived for many years on the Rinns of Islay. [104] However, recent research suggests that the obliteration of pre-Norse names throughout the Hebrides was almost total and Gaelic derived place names on the southern islands are of post-Norse origin. [47], Watson (1926) concluded that Adomnán's Airtraig is Shona but Geona and Ommon are unexplained and Longa could refer to several islands. It was formerly spoken over a far wider area than today, even in the recent past. Sgurr is a sharp promontory – with An Sgurr on Eigg, “The” sharp promontory by excellence. To ancient Celts, 4,000 years ago, the sound 'aub' denoted 'life-sustaining water'; it survives in 'abhainn' a river as in Abhainn Gleann Charadail, Glen Caradal’s river on Eigg, or Abhainn Sgathaig, Bog cotton river on Rum. referring to the peninsula of Kintyre. Gaelic place-names in the Small Isles. The modern names of Scottish islands stem from two main influences. Murray (1966) p. 49.
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gaelic island names


[31] Thus Ljoðhús means "song-house" (an unlikely name for an island) and Orcades (probably "islands of the boar people"[32]) became Orkneyar meaning "seal islands". What was described in the Statistical Account of 1794 as the grave of "a daughter of one of the Kings of Denmark" is marked by two small standing stones about 10 m apart, though there is, sadly, no good evidence to support this tradition. Baby names of Celtic – Gaelic Origin Celtic or Gaelic baby names are the names whose origin is the Gaels, meaning the group of people dominating in Ireland, the Scottish Highlands and the Isle of Man, a subgroup of the Celts. Don't just look at the current list of gaelic names when choosing your baby's name. [Note 12] However, the derivations of many of these early names are obscure "suggesting that they were coined very early on, some perhaps by the earliest settlers after the Ice Age.

Gaelic place names frequently describe the feature's colour. Later writers such as Adomnán and the authors of the Irish annals also contributed to our understanding of these early toponyms.


As she proceeded on her journey some of the stones fell out, one becoming Ireland, another Rathlin and a third Texa. Jennings, Andrew and Kruse, Arne "One Coast-Three Peoples: Names and Ethnicity in the Scottish West during the Early Viking period" in Woolf, Alex (ed.) The strory behind to Rubh' leum an Laraich, the Point of the mare's leap on Muck, is also long forgotten. M'Lauchlan, Rev. Sròn, - the nose - is a sharp promontory, Druim – back &‐ is a ridge, pap or mam - breast-  is a hill,  Cruachan – hip – is a circular stone outcrop, maol – bald  head – refers to a bare, rounded headland, Gualain – shoulder – is a rounded hillside. The following list is not exhaustive, but should help in de understanding of more names. The Norse Barreyarfjorder is probably the Sound of Barra[66] and Máeyar is the Isle of May in the Firth of Forth. (Margaret MacIndeor). The majority of Islay place names derive from Gaelic, while the more readable names are either Norse in origin or have been anglicised from one or other language. [113], The Hebrides remain the stronghold of the modern Gàidhealtachd and unsurprisingly this language has had a significant influence on the islands there. He provides no evidence for this assertion. The rulers of the Kingdom of the Isles, which comprised the Hebrides, the islands of the Firth of Clyde and the Isle of Man were of Norse origin from the mid-9th century. Thomas McLauchlan urged caution, noting that it "is necessary to ensure a historical, and hence an accurate instead of a fanciful, account of our topographical terms. Peggy Earl's favourite theory, however, concerned a Danish Princess called Iula, or Yula, who left Denmark with an apron full of stones of different sizes.

First recorded in 1190. From 849 on, when Columba's relics were removed in the face of Viking incursions, written evidence from local sources all but vanishes for three hundred years. Scottish Gaelic, along with modern Manx and Irish, are descended from Middle Irish, a derivative of Old Irish, which is descended in turn from Primitive Irish.

Cook Island Baby Names For Boys: 1. [29] It has also been suggested that Nave Island off Islay could be the identity of Elena.

As humans have lived on the islands of Scotland since at least Mesolithic times, it is clear that pre-modern languages must have been used, and by extension names for the islands, that have been lost to history. These islands have all been occupied by the speakers of at least three and in many cases four or more languages since the Iron Age, and many of the names of these islands have more than one possible meaning as a result. They also owe much to the culture and customs of the people who lived in the Small Isles throughout the ages.

[86][87], The roots of several of the Hebrides may also have a pre-Celtic origin. There are many names that derive from the Scottish Gaelic language in the Hebrides and Firth of Clyde. [Note 1]. It is a term used for the language(s) thought to have been spoken by the Picts, the people of northern and central Scotland in the Early Middle Ages.

Strang, Alistair (1997) "Explaining Ptolemy's Roman Britain". [47] Fitzpatrick-Matthews follows Rivet and Smith's suggestion for Erimon but as noted above Rùm is "Ruiminn" in the Félire Óengusso. It is clear that whenever place names are recorded at an early date as having been transposed from a form of P-Celtic into Gaelic that this occurred prior to the transformation from "Old British" into modern Welsh. [42] Hirta was recorded as "Hirt" in 1202. [Note 2] The presence of the monastery on Iona led to life in this part of Scotland in the Early Middle Ages being relatively well recorded from the mid-6th to the mid-9th century. Peat Smoke and Spirit [21][24][25][Note 3] Later texts in Latin, by writers such as Solinus, use the forms Hebudes and Hæbudes.

He believes Sasura is the modern Scarba, Minerve is Holy Island and Vinion is Sanda[19] and that Daroeda, Gradena and Longis may be Lunga, The Garvellachs and Muck respectively. [84][85] This may have been Pictish but there is no clear evidence for this. Belief in fairies and other otherwordly creatures such as the Broonie, a hairy, shaggy being who helped with the farm animals, is attested by numerous place names - Cnoc an t- Sithean ( the fairy hill), Na Sitheanan (the fairy mounds), Lòn nan Gruagach (the pool of the watermaiden),  Cnoc Oilteag (hill of the Broonie). There are many names that derive from the Scottish Gaelic language in the Hebrides and Firth of Clyde.In the Northern Isles most place names have a Norse origin. [114][115], There are also examples of island names that were originally Gaelic but have become completely replaced. References to trees, plants and animals are common - e.g.

It is officially recognised as autochthonous language under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. It is as if more modern writers were unhappy with Yla or Ilay and added an 's' to make it look more like the word 'island'. More Islay books... promontory of the cave residence or height, height of the howe/mound cairn/burial ground, head of the gully, or possible broad inlet, white hollow, or named after St Finlaggan, possibly Lag Froig from Gaelic froig, a cave, frothy loch, or not crooked, or loch of the excess, loch na dala = loch of the divisions, loch of delay, long eighth farm, or locally knows as long brae, big eighth farm, or locally known as big brae, short for Ellinor, Frederick Campbell's wife.

English is a West Germanic language, the modern variant of which is generally dated from about 1550. In the Small Isles, as in the rest of the Highlands and islands, place-names are particularly descriptive of the shape, colour and size of the landscape features. Holy Island off Arran is an entirely English name as is the collective Small Isles.
But as Viking and Gaels merged into one culture - that of the Gall-Gaidheal (foreign Gaels) - the Gaelic language too absorbed the Old Norse. Amiri: Amiri is a simple and straightforward name, meaning ‘rock.’ It’s one of the fastest rising baby boy names in Cook Island. The origin is indicated in the second column of the second table by the following key: G=Gaelic name, N=Norse name, G/N=derived from elements of both languages, A=ancient. Islay's fascinating story is uncovered in this must have book. 2. This the oldest known form of the Goidelic languages, which is known only from fragments, mostly personal names, inscribed on stone in the Ogham alphabet in Ireland and western Britain up to about the 6th century. There are two islands with names of joint Norse/Celtic origin, Ballin Smith, B. and Banks, I. "[81] It therefore seems possible that the early Gaels were just as fond of "analogical reformation" as the Norse. In addition to Arran (see above) Bute may have a British root and Great and Little Cumbrae both certainly have (see below). For example, Hunter (2000) states that in relation to King Bridei I of the Picts in the sixth century: "As for Shetland, Orkney, Skye and the Western Isles, their inhabitants, most of whom appear to have been Pictish in culture and speech at this time, are likely to have regarded Bridei as a fairly distant presence.”[102][103] However, the place names that existed prior to the 9th century have been all but obliterated by the incoming Norse-speaking Gall-Ghaeils.[104]. [100] The island of Threave on the River Dee in Dumfries and Galloway takes its name from P-Celtic tref, meaning "homestead". According to Ó Corráin (1998) "when and how the Vikings conquered and occupied the Isles is unknown, perhaps unknowable"[109] although from 793 onwards repeated raids by Vikings on the British Isles are recorded. From then on, it is commonly Ila, Yla and Ilay. Hudson, Benjamin T. (October 1998) "The Scottish Chronicle". Aonach is a mountain whose summit has the form of a ridge with steepish sides.

Pytheas of Massilia visited Britain – probably sometime between 322 and 285 BC – and described it as triangular in shape, with a northern tip called Orcas.

Bot dates from 1093 and Bote from 1204. Inchkeith in the Firth of Forth is recorded as "Insula Keth" in the 12th century Life of Saint Serf. [9] For example, Adomnán records Sainea, Elena, Ommon and Oideacha in the Inner Hebrides, which are of unknown location and these names must have passed out of usage in the Norse era. Adamnan wrote it is 'Ilea', describing it as an inhabited island, "Ilea insula habitabat", and also as 'green, grassy Islay', a phrase which is still used in the Gaelic, "Ile Ghorm an Fheoir". Islay is said to have got its name from this lady, or perhaps she may havve taken her name from Islay. Thomas (Jan 1866) "On the Kymric Element in the Celtic Topography of Scotland". Work with sheep is alluded to in Fang Ruadh, the red fank, or with bringing the crops: Cnoc an t-Sabhail: the hill of the barn. The related Scots language, sometimes regarded as a variety of English, has regional and historic importance in Scotland.

Lamb, Gregor "The Orkney Tongue" in Omand (2003) p. 250. "[82], The main difference between Youngson/MacEeachern and Fitzpatrick-Matthews is that the former assumes two different routes for the relevant Ravenna listings whereas the latter assumes the second list is further north and west. [26], For the individual Hebridean islands, Islay is Ptolemy's Epidion, Malaios is Mull and his Scetis is presumed to be Skye (although it is not listed as one of the Ebudes).[19][27][28].

Several of the islands of the Clyde have possible Brythonic roots. Early Christian missionary routes may be traced through names like Cill Donnan, the site of Donnan’s church on Eigg, Gleann Mhartein on Muck celebrating St martin anor Papadil on Rum refering to a solitary priest ( papa) in one of its valley.. Uamh a’ Chrabhaidh,  the cave of worship, refers to the cave used by priests in hiding after the reformation. probably adaptations of a pre-Norse language. Lamb, Gregor "The Orkney Tongue" in Omand (2003) pp.

[Note 13]. Peat Smoke and Spirit is the last word on Islay and its whiskies. The original meaning of the name is uncertain but appears to "correspond with that of Lewis". The guide therefor relied almost entirely on the accent of just one person, who was brought up in Bowmore, but lived for many years on the Rinns of Islay. [104] However, recent research suggests that the obliteration of pre-Norse names throughout the Hebrides was almost total and Gaelic derived place names on the southern islands are of post-Norse origin. [47], Watson (1926) concluded that Adomnán's Airtraig is Shona but Geona and Ommon are unexplained and Longa could refer to several islands. It was formerly spoken over a far wider area than today, even in the recent past. Sgurr is a sharp promontory – with An Sgurr on Eigg, “The” sharp promontory by excellence. To ancient Celts, 4,000 years ago, the sound 'aub' denoted 'life-sustaining water'; it survives in 'abhainn' a river as in Abhainn Gleann Charadail, Glen Caradal’s river on Eigg, or Abhainn Sgathaig, Bog cotton river on Rum. referring to the peninsula of Kintyre. Gaelic place-names in the Small Isles. The modern names of Scottish islands stem from two main influences. Murray (1966) p. 49.

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